Category Archives: Ultra-Large-Scale Systems

Free SEI Webinar 1/21/15: Architecting Software in a New Age

webinar

Date: January 21, 2015
Time: 1:30 PM ET – 3:00 PM ET
Cost: Free

Register

About the Webinar

Trends and New Directions in Software Architecture, by Linda Northrop
1:30 PM ET – 2:15 PM ET

Software architecture has enormous influence on the behavior of a system. For many categories of systems, early architectural decisions can be a greater influence on success than nearly any other factor. After more than twenty years of research and practice, the foundations for software architecture have been established and codified, but challenges remain. Among other trends, increased connectivity, a shift to the cloud and to mobile platforms, and increased operational and market tempos have precipitated the need for changes in architectural practices and decisions. The first talk shares a perspective on the trends influencing the need for change, the related architectural challenges, and the applicable research and practices.

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SATURN 2014 Art and Science of Scalability Session (notes)

Notes by Ziyad Alsaeed, edited by Tamara Marshall-Keim

BI/Big Data Reference Architectures and Case Studies
Serhiy Haziyev and Olha Hrytsay, SoftServe, Inc.

Serhiy and Olha shared their experience with the tradeoff between modern and traditional (non-relational and relational) reference architectures. They looked into the challenges associated with each approach and gave tips from real-life case studies on how to deal with big data reference architecture. As a reminder, they visited some of the known big data challenges:

  • Data is generated from many and different sources.
  • As data grows, it becomes complicated and heterogeneous (velocity and volume) until it’s no longer manageable.

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The Importance of Software Architecture in Big Data Systems

Many types of software systems, including big data applications, lend them themselves to highly incremental and iterative development approaches. In essence, system requirements are addressed in small batches, enabling the delivery of functional releases of the system at the end of every increment, typically once a month. The advantages of this approach are many and varied. Perhaps foremost is the fact that it constantly forces the validation of requirements and designs before too much progress is made in inappropriate directions. Ambiguity and change in requirements, as well as uncertainty in design approaches, can be rapidly explored through working software systems, not simply models and documents. Necessary modifications can be carried out efficiently and cost-effectively through refactoring before code becomes too “baked” and complex to easily change. This blog post at the SEI Blog by Ian Gorton of the SEI, the second in a series addressing the software engineering challenges of big data, explores how the nature of building highly scalable, long-lived big data applications influences iterative and incremental design approaches.

SEI Blog: Reflections on 20 Years of Software Architecture (Linda Northrop)

One of the most compelling and engaging events at SATURN 2012 was a panel discussion on the theme of “Reflections on 20 Years of Software Architecture.” The session was moderated by Rick Kazman of the SEI, and panelists were Linda Northrop of the SEI, Doug Schmidt of Vanderbilt University, Ian Gorton of Pacific Northwest National Lab, Robert Schwanke of Siemens Corporate Research, and Jeromy Carriere of X.commerce/eBay.

Today we began a series of blog posts at the SEI blog that will provide lightly edited transcripts of the remarks of our distinguished panelists.

Read the first in the series, Reflections on 20 Years of Software Architecture: A Presentation by Linda Northrop.

SEI Contributes to a National Supercomputing Initiative

For more than 10 years, scientists, researchers, and engineers used the TeraGrid supercomputer network funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF) to conduct advanced computational science. The SEI has joined a partnership of 17 organizations and helped develop the successor to the TeraGrid called the Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE). This post at the SEI blog, which is the first in a multi-part series, describes SEI work on XSEDE that allows researchers open access—directly from their desktops—to the suite of advanced computational tools and digital resources and services provided via XSEDE. This series is not so much concerned with supercomputers and supercomputing middleware, but rather with the nature of software engineering practice at the scale of the socio-technical ecosystem.

SEI Contributes to a National Supercomputing Initiative, at SEI blog.

Something for Everyone at SATURN 2012

Whether you are an aspiring software architect or an experienced practitioner, the SATURN 2012 Conference offers courses, presentations, tutorials, and talks tailored to your level of knowledge and experience.

Relative newcomers to architecture-centric engineering and development can take the introductory course in the SEI Software Architecture Curriculum, Software Architecture: Principles and Practices (SAPP) on Monday and Tuesday, May 7-8 at a discounted price. This popular course, offered each year at SATURN and taught this year by Rob Wojcik of the SEI, introduces participants to the essentials of software architecture. Also offered at SATURN this year is a half-day tutorial on Tuesday, May 8 by Peter Eeles of IBM Rational titled Software Architect 101. This tutorial (T1) provides attendees with a solid grounding in all aspects of software architecture and a framework on which they can build a deeper understanding of the role of the architect. Other Tuesday tutorials cover effective stakeholder collaboration (T2), integration of software architecture-centric methods into object-oriented analysis and design (T3), and architectural implications of cloud computing (T4).

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Real-Time Scheduling on Heterogeneous Multicore Processors

Many systems—particularly cyber-physical systems—are subject to stringent size, weight, and power requirements. The quantity of sensor readings and functionalities is also increasing, and their associated processing must fulfill real-time requirements. This situation motivates the need for computers with greater processing capacity. For example, to fulfill the requirements of nano-sized unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs), developers must choose a computer platform that offers significant processing capacity and use its processing resources to meet its needs for autonomous surveillance missions. This blog post at the SEI blog discusses these issues and highlights SEI research that addresses them.

SATURN 2012 Registration Now Open

Registration is now open for the eighth annual SEI Architecture Technology User Network (SATURN) 2012 Conference. Register by April 9 to take advantage of early-bird savings, which include $250 off the regular full-conference rate.

SATURN 2012 will be held May 7-11, 2012 in St. Petersburg, Florida  at the St. Petersburg Bayfront Hilton hotel. The conference is presented in collaboration with IEEE Software magazine.

Architecture: Catalyst for Collaboration

The SATURN 2012 program includes more than 25 technical sessions, tutorials, courses, panel discussions, and keynote addresses that will explore how effective collaboration across geographical, cultural, and technical boundaries is increasingly prevalent and essential to system success. You will leave the SATURN 2012 conference with new ideas and solutions to implement in your organization. You will also have the opportunity to

To register and review rates, visit the SATURN 2012 website. We hope to see you in Florida!

SATURN 2012 – Architecture: Catalyst for Collaboration

Here at the SEI, we are excited to be planning for SATURN 2012, which we will hold in St. Petersburg, Florida on May 7-11, 2012. SATURN has grown in attendance, influence, and stature every year since its inception in 2005 as a small gathering of practitioners and SEI technical staff members. With another successful conference last year in San Mateo, California, SATURN is now a truly international conference with prestigious keynote speakers and a technical program that has become more ambitious in scope and engaging in content each year.

Along with the SEI SATURN Technical Committee–Ipek Ozkaya, Robert Nord, John Klein, and Soumya Simanta–I’m happy to announce the theme we have chosen for SATURN 2012 and invite you, our SATURN blog readers, to consider being a part of the SATURN technical program by submitting an abstract for a presentation or tutorial. Entering the third year of our mutually beneficial collaboration with IEEE Software magazine, we again offer to SATURN presenters the possibility that a paper based on their presentations will be featured in a future issue of IEEE Software. Papers from presentations at SATURN 2011 will be published in forthcoming issues this year.

As projects continue to grow in scale and complexity, effective collaboration across geographical, cultural, and technical boundaries is increasingly prevalent and essential to system success. SATURN 2012 will explore the theme of “Architecture: Catalyst for Collaboration.” We will include presentations, courses, and tutorials on

  • collaboration in software development; for example, architecture in an Agile project
  • collaboration in the context of mobile computing, cloud computing, social networking, open frameworks, and service-oriented architecture
  • knowledge management for effective collaboration
  • systems of systems and ultra-large-scale systems: how to achieve collaboration across independently funded and managed organizations
  • multi-agent systems and collaboration among non-human entities such as software and networks
  • collaborative design and architecture tools

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SATURN 2011 Keynote: Jan Bosch, Architecture in the Age of Compositionality

Abstract and presentation materials

1. SPEED

Increasing speed trumps any other improvements R&D can provide to the company. As a process, methods, or tools professional, there is only one measure that justifies your existence: how have you helped teams move faster?

There is exponential growth between the introduction of a technology and the full economic exploitation of that technology. No efficiency improvement will outperform cycle-time reduction. So don’t optimize efficiency, optimize speed. “If you’re a fast race car, everything is efficient.”

“If you are not moving at the speed of the marketplace, you’re already dead–you just haven’t stopped breathing yet.” – Jack Welch

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