Tag Archives: microservices

Rich Program Earns Praise from SATURN 2015 Conference Attendees

See this summary of the SATURN 2015 Conference on the SEI website.

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Microservices Workshop at SATURN 2015

On Monday, April 27, before the start of SATURN 2015, a small group of 16 software engineers met to explore ideas around the emerging microservices architecture trend. Microservices have seen a rapid rise in popularity over the past year or so, and we thought it would make an interesting topic of discussion. Sam Newman’s book covers significant ground and yet there there are still many nuances that we don’t fully understand.

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SATURN 2015: Perspectives on the Modern Practice of Software Architecture (Session Notes)

Jeromy Carriere, Rick Buskens, and Jack Greenfield, Google

Evolving Mission-Critical “Legacy” Systems, Rick Buskens

Buskens’s team is a multisite team that works on a suite of projects focused on Google’s internal structure, while others are external-facing and cloud. The infrastructure for running services at Google is built on Borg, a cluster-management system that runs hundreds of thousands of jobs across thousands of applications in clusters of tens of thousands of machines. Borg is an internal cloud infrastructure, whose users have many different needs; a service configuration specification called BCL (Borg Configuration Language) allows users to tell Borg what those needs are. Buskens’s team works on Borg Config, which interprets the service configuration for Borg; it manages the millions of jobs running each day. BorgCron works for scheduled and repeated tasks at Google scale.

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SATURN 2015: DevOps Essentials for Software Architects

Len Bass; Sascha Bates, Chef; Sam Newman, ThoughtWorks

by Jacob Tate, Mount St. Mary’s University

Len Bass, Sascha Bates, and Sam Newman started off the afternoon session with a presentation titled “DevOps: Essentials for Software Architects.” Dr. Bass introduced this session by explaining exactly what the speakers will mean by “DevOps.” He stated that after software architects or engineers finish their job, it often takes too long to get their code into production. DevOps is concerned with reducing the time from code completion to code production. Errors in code and miscommunication about which versions of which tools are being used are some of the biggest problems causing the process to be slow. We can speed up deployment by setting up an architecture so that development teams do not have to coordinate with each other; this coordination is where a lot of time is lost.

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Microservices to Go on Trial at SATURN 2015

At SATURN 2015, the software architecture community will put microservices on trial.

Here is an abstract of this event, which will take place on Tuesday, April 28, from 5:00 to 6:00 pm:

Microservices architecture has emerged as a widely discussed style of building distributed web and internet systems. Proponents argue that this variant of service-oriented architecture (SOA) is well suited to address the challenges of cloud computing, scalability, increased flexibility, and complexity, among others.

But haven’t we seen this all before? Is there really anything new and interesting about microservices architecture? Or is this simply a case of history repeating itself, like the last time service-oriented architectures were all the rage?

Microservices architecture is hereby charged with being an attractive nuisance in the first degree. SATURN 2015 has recruited an expert panel of judges to debate the benefits and perils of microservices architecture and help you, the jury, learn the facts and determine the final verdict.

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