Tag Archives: SEI

SATURN 2015 Keynotes

We are pleased to announce our three keynote speakers for the 11th annual SEI Architecture Technology User Network (SATURN) Conference 2015. SATURN 2015 will be held April 27–30, at the Lord Baltimore Hotel, Baltimore, Md.


Mary Shaw, the Alan J. Perlis University Professor of Computer Science at Carnegie Mellon University, and recipient of the U.S. National Medal of Technology and Innovation. Co-author of Software Architecture: Perspectives on an Emerging Discipline, she is considered to be one of the founders of the field of software architecture.


Gregor Hohpe, chief IT architect at Allianz, co-author of Enterprise Integration Patterns, and a frequent speaker at conferences around the world. His accessible but technically accurate essays were republished in 97 Things Every Software Architect Should Know and The Best Software Writing.


Mark Schwartz, chief information officer, U.S. Citizenship and Immigration Services, Department of Homeland Security (DHS). Schwartz has introduced such practices as agile and lean development, continuous delivery, and DevOps and also leads efforts across DHS to introduce agile IT approaches.

Continue reading

Why You Should Submit Your SATURN 2015 Proposal NOW

At SATURN, we hate the idea that a good talk might be rejected because its abstract is unclear or doesn’t answer questions that the reviewers might ask. Good talks should not be rejected because the proposal is not absolutely perfect.

So last year we introduced an early-acceptance deadline for speaker submissions, and it worked out really well. The quality of presentations was higher than in years past, and we overcame the dreaded Student’s Syndrome–everyone waiting until the night before to submit.

But this year we asked ourselves, Can we give even more opportunities? Can we make the proposal process even more friendly?

For SATURN 2015, we have adopted a rolling-acceptance approach.This means that the review committee is continuously reviewing speaker proposals as they are submitted. When reviewers see a great proposal, it is accepted immediately and added to the technical program. Authors of other proposals get detailed feedback about what the reviewers are thinking and what questions they have, so they can revise and resubmit.

No longer will you have to hire a soothsayer to guess what the committee might have been thinking, only to have the feedback too late to do anything about it.

We have been accepting speaker proposals since October though the website was lagging a bit. That has been corrected and the full list of speakers accepted is now available. The line-up so far is looking stellar.

The final deadline for acceptance is January 16, but that doesn’t mean you should wait until the last minute!  If you want the opportunity to be accepted early or to receive feedback for improving your proposal for resubmission, you should submit your proposal right now.

SATURN is a conference for working professionals. Our rolling acceptance and early feedback this year should make it easier for you to speak at SATURN, so don’t delay!

-Michael Keeling and George Fairbanks
SATURN 2015 Co-Technical Chairs

National Medal of Technology and Innovation Recipient Mary Shaw to Deliver Keynote at SATURN 2015

For pioneering leadership in the development of innovative curricula in computer science, Dr. Mary Shaw of Carnegie Mellon University received the National Medal of Technology and Innovation from President Barack Obama during a White House ceremony in November 2014. The SATURN 2015 program committee is pleased to announce that Dr. Shaw will deliver a keynote presentation at SATURN 2015, which will be held at the Lord Baltimore Hotel in Baltimore, Maryland, April 27-30.


Mary Shaw is the Alan J. Perlis University Professor of Computer Science in the Institute for Software Research at Carnegie Mellon University, where she has been a member of the faculty since completing her PhD in 1972. The medal is the nation’s highest honor for achievement in the field of technology, innovation, and invention.

Shaw’s work on software architecture helped establish it as a recognized discipline. Selecting an appropriate architecture is now recognized as a critical step in the engineering of complex software systems for everything from the anti-lock braking systems in cars to the international banking system.

For 2015, the SATURN program committee has redesigned the event’s technical program to accommodate growth, expand opportunities for interaction and education, and offer participants greater flexibility in designing their conference experience. To learn more about changes to this year’s program, see SATURN 2015 Expands to Three Days, Offers New Options on the SEI website.

Proposals for the SATURN 2015 technical program are now being accepted. Please submit proposals for presentations of 15, 30, and/or 90 minutes to the online submission system no later than January 16, 2015.

For more information about SATURN 2015, please visit http://www.sei.cmu.edu/saturn/2015/.

SEI Offers Course on Big Data

Software Engineering Institute (SEI) research forms the foundation for a new one-day course from the SEI, Big Data: Architectures and Technologies.

To learn more, see this article about the SEI big-data course on the SEI website.

The new big-data course, along with one-day courses on DevOps and technical debt, will be offered at SATURN 2015, which will be held in Baltimore, Maryland, April 27-30.

“What I learned at a SATURN conference and applied in my organization”

How has something you learned or saw at SATURN changed how you develop software?

Since the first conference in 2004, SATURN has been a place for software developers to share stories about our adventures in building software. Architects, managers, and programmers from across industries and the world came together once a year to share stories about our experiences applying software architecture-centric practices.

Continue reading

SATURN 2015 Proposal Guidelines

One of our goals every year with SATURN is to create a solid technical program that is informative, engaging, and lasting. When evaluating proposals for the program, the review committee uses the following guidelines to help decide whether a proposal is a good match for this year’s conference. In these guidelines, the term “session” is used generically to describe any talks, workshops, tutorials, and so on in the conference program.

Informative sessions share meaningful insights with lessons that attendees will be able to apply directly with their teams after the conference.

  • Is the information proposed relevant to one of the topic themes in this year’s conference?
  • Are there succinct lessons supported by real-world examples, research, or direct experience?
  • Is the topic of broad or general interest?
  • Can the lessons be applied beyond small sub-communities of practice?

Engaging sessions create an active learning environment that promotes information retention and generally gets attendees excited about the topics discussed. Continue reading

Making SATURN 2015 the Best SATURN Conference Ever

The SEI Architecture Technology User Network (SATURN) Conference 2015 will be held at the Lord Baltimore Hotel in Baltimore, Maryland, April 27–30, 2015. We are pleased to announce that the co-technical chairs of SATURN 2015 will be George Fairbanks of Google and Michael Keeling of IBM. Based on your feedback in the hallways in Portland and from post-conference surveys, George, Michael, and the rest of the SATURN technical committee have designed SATURN 2015 to better meet your needs in a practitioner-oriented technical conference.

The SATURN 2015 Call for Submissions is now open. As described in the Call, we will immediately begin a rolling-acceptance process for proposal submissions, so submit early to get feedback and improve your chances.

What’s New for 2015

Continue reading

Free SEI Webinar 9/11: Architecture Analysis with AADL


Date: September 11, 2014
Time: 1:30 p.m. ET – 2:30 p.m. ET     
Cost: Complimentary


About the Webinar

Continue reading

Rey Hernandez on For Maximum Awesome, Joe Justice SATURN 2014 Keynote

by Rey Hernandez
Sony Network Entertainment International

Many times in a project, software or otherwise, the people working on the project become so entrenched in the methods they find familiar that they allow roadblocks to get in the way of project completion. All too often those roadblocks lead to missed deadlines, cut corners, general reduction in team morale, and ultimately a product that does not meet customer expectations. In his keynote at SATURN 2014, Joe Justice of Team Wikispeed and Scrum Inc., treated us to a refreshing view of project management that illustrates how teams can be extremely productive, with high morale, and great customer satisfaction.

Continue reading

Link Roundup, July 29, 2014: The Cloud

The Cloud

The Future Looks “Foggy” for Cloud Computing: Greg Otto at FedScoop reports on cloudlets and cyberforaging, potential solutions for bandwidth problems at the edge of the cloud, from a talk given by the Software Engineering Institute’s Grace Lewis at the Federal Cloud Computing Summit.

Virtual Machines, JavaScript and Assembler: In a keynote presentation at the 2014 O’Reilly Velocity ConferenceScott Hanselman “explores the relationship between the cloud and the browser, many languages and one language, how it might all fit together, and what comes next.”

SMBs Tie Cloud Computing To Increased Revenue: Charles Babcock at InformationWeek reports on research by Oxford Economics and Windstream Communications that found that small and midsized businesses credit cloud computing with increasing revenues.

The Uneven Future: 2 Telling Views of Cloud Adoption: Bernard Golden at CIO gives three reasons for the uneven growth of cloud computing.