Tag Archives: SOA

First Software Solutions Conference, Arlington, Va., Nov. 16-18, 2015

Software: Catalyst of Change

With the increasing reliance on and penetration of software into everyday lives, the need for organizations to predictably develop, acquire, and sustain high-quality software systems has never been greater. To address this need, the Carnegie Mellon University Software Engineering Institute (SEI) is pleased to announce that it will host its first Software Solutions Conference (SSC) at the Hilton Crystal City in Arlington, Va., from Nov. 16 through 18.

Review the conference program here.
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Link Roundup, 10/21/14: The Watson Explorer

The Watson Explorer

The Watson Developer Cloud brings Watson to developers and the cognitive cloud to Internet applications. Watson offers a variety of services for building cognitive apps, including language identification and translation, interpreting meaning based on context, and communicating with people in their own styles. Here are some reviews and links to APIs and sample code.

IBM’s Watson Supercomputer Gives Developers Access to Cognitive Cloud: George Lawton at TechTarget provides an early review of the Watson Explorer’s unified view of enterprise information. The cloud allows the technology to be accessible for a greater variety of applications and improves the scale and time to market of those applications.

IBM Debuts First Watson Machine-Learning APIs: Serdar Yegulalp at Java World previews the eight services that developers can access for building cognitive apps based on Watson’s machine intelligence service. He focuses on visualization rendering as the service least limited by data training. Continue reading

Link Roundup, 9/8/14: Microservice Architecture

Microservice Architecture

Since James Lewis and Martin Fowler published their article on Microservices in March 2014, the microservices architecture pattern has been the subject of much debate in the blogosphere: Is there a good definition for it (or not), is it another form of SOA (or not), is it an answer to the monolith (or not), is it a fad or the next big thing? The following blog posts contribute to the discussion on some of these topics.

Failing at Microservices: Please avoid our mistakes!: Richard Clayton’s Unrepentant Thoughts on Software and Management recently included a blog post about his team’s attempt to implement a microservice architecture, four reasons why it failed, and some recommendations for avoiding these problems.

Microservices for the Grumpy Neckbeard: Chris Stucchio discusses what he sees as the two camps of the debate about microservices, the hipsters who see their many benefits and the neckbeards who are more suspicious, and describes an architecture that may serve to bring the two camps together. Continue reading

SATURN 2014 Architectural Modeling Session (notes)

Notes by Ziyad Alsaeed, edited by Tamara Marshall-Keim

Expanding Legacy Systems Using Model-Driven Engineering (MDE)
William Smith, Northrop Grumman
Kevin Nguyen, Northrop Grumman

Kevin Nguyen and his fellow engineers faced a common problem of dealing with legacy systems. At their environment (Northrop Grumman), they are dealing with rigid defense systems. Kevin tried to adapt a model-driven engineering approach in his work to achieve his goals. The team used conceptual software architecture to help understand customer requirements. Next, they refined the requirements into a CSCI architecture of software and hardware. Then, they tried to expand the CSCI architecture into CSC architecture (more detailed and lower level models). Finally, the team tried to convert that into a detailed design for the software unit. They went through these steps following a basic procedure of software-design life cycle.

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1st ACM International Conference on Mobile Software Engineering and Systems (MobileSoft 2014)

1st ACM International Conference on Mobile Software Engineering and Systems
MobileSoft 2014
http://www.sigsoft.org/mobilesoft2014
June 2-3, 2014 Hyderabad, India

Co-located with ICSE 2014 May 31- June 7, 2014
http://2014.icse-conferences.org

Important Dates
!!! EXTENDED !!!
Submission: January 27, 2014
Notification: February 24, 2014
Camera: March 3, 2014
Conference: June. 2-3, 2014

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Migrating Legacy Applications: Challenges in Service Oriented Architecture and Cloud Computing Environments

As the future of software development in a global environment continues to be influenced by the areas of service-oriented architecture (SOA) and cloud computing, developers will need to migrate many legacy applications to these environments to take advantage of the benefits offered by the service environment.

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SATURN 2013 Mobile Computing Session (notes)

Notes by Frank M. Rischner

Architecture Patterns for Mobile Systems in Resource-Constrained Environments
Grace Lewis, Jeff Boleng, Gene Cahill, Edwin Morris, Marc Novakouski, James Root, and Soumya Simanta, SEI

First responders, soldiers, and other front-line personnel work in resource-constrained environments. It is necessary to use mobile systems in those environments. The systems are limited in performance and battery life.

This talk is about architectural patterns. The first pattern Lewis talked about is the Data Source Integration Pattern, which means the data source is on the server. Some of the operations on the data are very power consuming, so we don’t want them on the mobile device. The user defines the filters on the mobile device and sends them to the server. The second pattern is the Group Context Awareness Pattern. The users don’t go out in the field alone. The users’ devices are connected to the same controller, so all devices show the same view. Since the users are not in the field alone and probably operate in a close area, only one device needs the GPS has to be turned on. This model is a layered MVC pattern. Rule sets apply to the mission and are interchangeable. The third pattern is the Cloudlet-Based Cyber-Foraging Pattern. Cyber-foraging has been around for a while; the most known application is probably Siri from Apple. The Cloudlet-Based Cyber-Foraging base is on a VM manager.

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SATURN 2013 Cloud Computing Session (notes)

Notes by Frank M. Rischner

BestBuy.com’s Cloud Architecture
Joel Crabb, Best Buy, Inc.

Crabb works for BestBuy, the world largest multi-channel consumer.

In 2010, BestBuy built a team to experiment with cloud components. Smaller web properties have been stored in the cloud. Also, the test environments have been put in the cloud.

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SATURN 2013 Keynote Address: 15 Years of SOA at Credit Suisse: Lessons Learned and Remaining Challenges, Stephan Murer

Notes by Frank M. Rischner, Ian De Silva, and Brendan Foote

SATURN 2013 Keynote Address: 15 Years of SOA at Credit Suisse: Lessons Learned and Remaining Challenges

Stephan Murer, Credit Suisse

Murer works for Credit Suisse, which finds competitive advantage in creating their own systems, rather than outsourcing that work to software vendors. The company handles a large-scale user base, with almost 67,750 users in 550 locations. The data is managed and stored in four main data centers. Currently, Credit Suisse manages about 6,400 applications as well as about 70,000 email accounts. The volume of the applications developed in-house is about 200 million lines of code. The number of managed applications at Credit Suisse is of course lower than in any app store, but the focus is more on the integration of the applications. The largest scalability concern Murer sees coming is storage, for example, if regulators require them to start recording video conferences for compliance reasons.

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Architecting Service-Oriented Systems

In 2009, a popular blogger published a post entitled “SOA is Dead,” which generated extensive commentary among those who work in the field of service-oriented architecture (SOA). Many practitioners in this field completely misinterpreted the post; some read the title and just assumed that the content referenced the demise of SOA. Quite the opposite, the post was inviting people to stop thinking about SOA as a set of technologies and start embracing SOA as an approach for designing, developing, and managing distributed systems that goes beyond just the technology. Unfortunately, even though SOA is still alive and widely adopted, a belief still persists that SOA can be purchased off the shelf. This post at the SEI blog highlights recent research aimed at clarifying this misperception for architects, as well as identifying the elements that constitute a service-oriented system and the relationships between these elements.