Tag Archives: software architecture

SATURN 2015: Perspectives on the Modern Practice of Software Architecture (Session Notes)

Jeromy Carriere, Rick Buskens, and Jack Greenfield, Google

Evolving Mission-Critical “Legacy” Systems, Rick Buskens

Buskens’s team is a multisite team that works on a suite of projects focused on Google’s internal structure, while others are external-facing and cloud. The infrastructure for running services at Google is built on Borg, a cluster-management system that runs hundreds of thousands of jobs across thousands of applications in clusters of tens of thousands of machines. Borg is an internal cloud infrastructure, whose users have many different needs; a service configuration specification called BCL (Borg Configuration Language) allows users to tell Borg what those needs are. Buskens’s team works on Borg Config, which interprets the service configuration for Borg; it manages the millions of jobs running each day. BorgCron works for scheduled and repeated tasks at Google scale.

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SATURN 2015: Systems Characterization: An Approach to Modernizing Disparate Legacy Systems (Session Notes)

Jane Orsulak and Julie Kent, Raytheon

by Jacob Tate, Mount St. Mary’s University

Jane Orsulak and Julie Kent kicked off the experience-presentation session on SATURN’s final day by talking about “System Characterization: An Approach to Modernizing Disparate Legacy Systems.” In this presentation, they gave a summary of some of the training that soldiers have to go through, such as live training and virtual training.

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SATURN 2015: QA to AQ: Shifting from Quality Assurance to Agile Quality (Session Notes)

Rebecca Wirfs-Brock, Wirfs-Brock Associates, and Joseph Yoder, The Refactory, Inc.

How do you make quality happen? Budget time for quality discussions and quality testing. During envisioning and requirements gathering, identify core qualities. The core goal of agile and lean was not just to go faster, but to get rid of waste. Quality can be a result of those processes, but you need to engineer for quality by architecting for quality and then testing for it. You’ll also need to determine appropriate times when qualities can be tested and delivered.

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SATURN 2015: Never Again Offline?! Experiences in the Outstanding Role of Data in a Large-Scale Mobile App Ecosystem (Session Notes)

Matthias Naab, Fraunhofer IESE; Ralf Carbon, John Deere; and Susanne Braun, Fraunhofer IESE

by Jacob Tate, Mount St. Mary’s University

Drs. Ralf Carbon and Matthias Naab kicked off the short-presentation afternoon session with their talk titled “Never Again Offline?!? Experiences on the Outstanding Role of Data in a Large-Scale Mobile App Ecosystem.” As you might gather from the lengthy title, there was an abundance of information packed into these 30 minutes.

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SATURN 2015 Keynote: It’s Good to Be Architect (Session Notes)

Gregor Hohpe, Allianz

by Jacob Tate, Mount St. Mary’s University

Wednesday’s keynote speaker was Gregor Hohpe, who is the Chief IT Architect with Allianz. He delivered an information-packed presentation on why exactly it is good to be an architect.

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SATURN 2015: Open Medical Record System Plus (OpenMRS+): OpenMRS for Non-Communicable Diseases (Session Notes)

Gloria Ingabire, Carnegie Mellon University

OpenMRS is an existing, robust medical record system (MRS), and Ingabire is proposing some additional functions for it, called OpenMRS+. She was inspired to take on this challenge by her mother’s history of diabetes and uncle’s history of cardiovascular disease. If people knew the likelihood of getting a non-communicable disease, they might be more likely to take precautions.

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SATURN 2015: Living a Nightmare, Dreaming a Dream: A Drupal Deployment Dilemma (Session Notes)

Gail E. Harris, TVOntario

TVOntario’s mandate since 1970 has been to “use electronic and associated media to provide educational opportunities for all people in Ontario.” TVO has embraced the internet and mobile space: they support an online high school degree, games for children and curriculum, and current affairs documentaries.

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SATURN 2015: Software Architecture as Code (Session Notes)

Simon Brown, Coding the Architecture

by Jacob Tate, Mount St. Mary’s University

Simon Brown taught us a lot in his session titled “Software Architecture as Code.” From teaching us where Jersey is to how to extract architecture from code, Brown gave a riveting talk on bridging the gap between architecture and code. Diagrams for software architecture are often messy; one developer cannot distinguish another’s way of thinking by looking at sloppy boxes and mismatched lines. Would we write our code this way? Our code does not map to the architectural views we created, and this is a problem.

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SATURN 2015 Keynote: Progress Toward an Engineering Discipline of Software (Session Notes)

Mary Shaw, Carnegie Mellon University

by Jacob Tate, Mount St. Mary’s University

The SATURN 2015 Conference is underway, and what a great start! As the largest SATURN Conference to date with over 200 attendees, you can feel the excitement and buzz of the people who traveled from all over the globe to attend. It kicked off yesterday with a few special sessions and classes, but more notably with the introductions and the first keynote speaker this morning. Mary Shaw gave a fast-paced lecture on the progress of engineering in terms of the software discipline. She explored the question “Is software engineering really engineering?” and systematically explained the various definitions of engineering, such as “creating cost-effective solutions to practical problems by applying codified knowledge and building things in the service of mankind.”

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Microservices to Go on Trial at SATURN 2015

At SATURN 2015, the software architecture community will put microservices on trial.

Here is an abstract of this event, which will take place on Tuesday, April 28, from 5:00 to 6:00 pm:

Microservices architecture has emerged as a widely discussed style of building distributed web and internet systems. Proponents argue that this variant of service-oriented architecture (SOA) is well suited to address the challenges of cloud computing, scalability, increased flexibility, and complexity, among others.

But haven’t we seen this all before? Is there really anything new and interesting about microservices architecture? Or is this simply a case of history repeating itself, like the last time service-oriented architectures were all the rage?

Microservices architecture is hereby charged with being an attractive nuisance in the first degree. SATURN 2015 has recruited an expert panel of judges to debate the benefits and perils of microservices architecture and help you, the jury, learn the facts and determine the final verdict.

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